Asia

Globalization in India: Commuters in Mumbai #4

29 year old Selina Uttankar begins her journey from the small fishing village of Manori at 04.45, early enough to get to the main fish market to sell her goods. Travelling by ferry, autorickshaw, train, bus and on foot through the city's streets and beach front, she makes the 12-hour return journey through Elphinstone and Bandra to sell seafood three times each week.

Globalization in India: Commuters in Mumbai #2

Mohammed Muslim, 70, begins his 14 hour day in Colaba, in South Mumbai and delivers to Cuffe Parade, Post Office, Badhwar Park and Colaba Market. His packages range from post and paper to plastic and bread. A cyclist in what is becoming more and more a landscape of cars, Muslim navigates the busy roads, interchanges and pedestrian blocked neighbourhoods on bike and by foot covering over 25 km every day.

Globalization in India: Commuters in Mumbai #1

Lajja Shah, the 27 year old fashion stylist navigates the streets of Mumbai managing several key meetings during the day, and making extensive use of her mobile phone. Travelling over 36 km through the private toll road of Aarey Colony, to Marol, Andheri, Mahalaxmi, Bandra and Khar by autorickshaw, train, local taxi, on foot and by private car, Lajja ends her day at 22.00 at a major fashion show in Kalina.

Global Power Shifts in the Age of Globalization

About this talk: Historian and diplomat Joseph Nye gives us the 30,000-foot view of the shifts in power between China and the US, and the global implications as economic, political and "soft" power shifts and moves around the globe. About Joseph Nye: The former assistant secretary of defense and former dean of Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, Joseph Nye offers sharp insights into the way nations take and cede power.