Images of globalization

Number of undernourished children projected in 2050

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/number-of-undernourished-children-projec...

 

Number of undernourished children projected in 2050. Food security is likely to remain out of reach for many people. Child malnutrition will be difficult to eradicate even by 2050 (low to medium certainty) and is projected to increase in some regions in some Millennium Assessment scenarios, despite increasing food supply under all four scenarios (medium to high certainty) and more diversified diets in poor countries (low to medium certainty).

Number of undernourished children projected in 2050

World poverty distribution

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/world-poverty-distribution

 

World poverty distribution. Three-quarters of all poor people still live in rural areas. They are heavily reliant on natural resources for their livelihoods: soil, water, forests and fisheries underpin commercial and subsistence activities and often provide a safety net to the poor in times of crises. These natural resources which are abundant in many developing countries - represent an important asset and potential wealth for poor people and their communities. As many of these natural resources are renewable and if properly managed this wealth is long term. Improved natural resource management can support long-term economic growth, from which poor people, in rural areas and elsewhere, can benefit to achieve and sustain social progress and development. The map is a part of a set, presenting different natural resources, with a focus on developing countries, and the use of natural resources for economic growth and poverty alleviation.

World poverty distribution

Trends in urban and rural populations, less developed regions, 1960-2030 (estimates and projections)

Sources: United Nations Population Division. 2007. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2007 Revision Population Database. HYPERLINK 'http://esa.un.org/unup/index.asp?panel=1' http://esa.un.org/unup/index.asp?panel=1 (Accessed November 28, 2008) Link to web-site http://www.grida.no/publications/rr/food-crisis/ Cartographer/Designer: Hugo Ahlenius, Nordpil Appears in: The Environmental Food Crisis - The Environment's Role in Averting Future Food Crises Published: 2009 (Available: UNEP)Trends in urban and rural populations, less developed regions, 1960-2030 (estimates and projections)

Global poverty-biodiversity map

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/global-poverty-biodiversity-map

 

Global poverty-biodiversity map. This map may be used to show areas in which biodiversity is threatened. Areas where high poverty and high population density coincides with high biodiversity may indicate areas in which poor people likely have no other choice than to unsustainably extract resources, in turn threatening biodiversity. The map has been produced from three primary data sources – stunted growth data collected on first level administrative units from FAO (FAO 2004), population density from LandScan (LandScan, 2002), and areas of high biological significance (major tropical wilderness and biodiversity hotspots) from Conservation International (Christ et al., 2003).

Global poverty-biodiversity map

The world's population in 2100

May 13th 2011, 13:48 by The Economist online
The world’s population will reach 7 billion by the end of October, according to the latest projections from the United Nations. For the first time the UN has attempted to look as far ahead as 2100, using various assumptions about how fertility and mortality rates might change over the years. The average of these estimates suggests that the global population will cross 10 billion by 2085. By 2100, 22.3% of people will be aged 65 or over, up from just 7.6% in 2010. The bulk of population growth is expected to come from the developing world. Africa’s population will rise from 1 billion in 2010 to 3.6 billion in 2100. In 1950, 32% of the world’s people lived in today’s rich countries. By 2100, only 13% will.

The world's population in 2100