Images of globalization

Country income groups (World Bank classification)

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/country-income-groups-world-bank-classif...

 

Country income groups (World Bank classification). There are huge regional differences in the above trends. Globally, poverty rates have fallen from 52% in 1981 to 42% in 1990 and to 26% in 2005. In Sub-Saharan Africa, however, the poverty rate remained constant at around 50%. This region also comprises the majority of countries making the least progress in reducing child malnutrition. The poverty rate in East Asia fell from nearly 80% in 1980 to under 20% by 2005. East Asia, notably China, was successful in more than halving the proportion of underweight children between 1990 and 2006. In contrast, and despite improvements since 1990, almost 50% of the children are underweight in Southern Asia. This region alone accounts for more than half the world’s malnourished children.

Country income groups (World Bank classification)

Human population growth rates, 1990–2000, and per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and biological productivity in 2000 in eco

Available: UNEP Human population growth rates, 1990–2000, and per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and biological productivity in 2000 in ecological systems. Millennium Assessment systems with the lowest net primary productivity and lowest GDP tended to have the highest population growth rates between 1990 and 2000. Urban, inland water, and marine systems are not included due to the somewhat arbitrary nature of determining net primary productivity of the system (urban) or population growth and GDP (freshwater and marine) for them.Human population growth rates, 1990–2000, and per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and biological productivity in 2000 in eco

Urban Growth per Hour

This world map shows the population growth per hour projected through 2015 in some of the fastest growing cities with more than one million people. Source: http://www.urban-age.net/10_cities/_data/data_UAC.html (please visit for more information)

Urban Growth per Hour

The world's population in 2100

May 13th 2011, 13:48 by The Economist online
The world’s population will reach 7 billion by the end of October, according to the latest projections from the United Nations. For the first time the UN has attempted to look as far ahead as 2100, using various assumptions about how fertility and mortality rates might change over the years. The average of these estimates suggests that the global population will cross 10 billion by 2085. By 2100, 22.3% of people will be aged 65 or over, up from just 7.6% in 2010. The bulk of population growth is expected to come from the developing world. Africa’s population will rise from 1 billion in 2010 to 3.6 billion in 2100. In 1950, 32% of the world’s people lived in today’s rich countries. By 2100, only 13% will.

The world's population in 2100

Commodity flows: Starbucks, McDonald's

Starbucks and McDonald's Map, International Networks Archive (INA), Princeton University (http://www.princeton.edu/~ina/index.html)

This map visualize the commodity flow mediated by Starbucks and McDonald's.

Commodity flows: Starbucks, McDonald's

Green Jobs in the Future

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/green-jobs-in-the-future

 

Sources: UNEP-ILO-IOD-ITUC, Green Jobs: Towards decent work in a sustainable, low carbon world, 2008

Green Jobs in the Future

Urban, dryland, and polar systems

Urban, dryland, and polar systems. Urban systems are built environments with a high human density. For mapping purposes, the MA uses known human settlements with a population of 5,000 or more, with boundaries delineated by observing persistent night-time lights or by inferring areal extent in the cases where such observations are absent.

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/urban-dryland-and-polar-systems

 

Urban, dryland, and polar systems