Images of globalization

Gross Domestic Product (GDP) average annual growth, 1990–2003

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Gross Domestic Product (GDP) average annual growth, 1990–2003. Average annual percentage growth rate of GDP at market prices based on constant local currency. Dollar figures for GDP are converted from domestic currencies using 1995 official exchange rates. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products.

Gross Domestic Product (GDP) average annual growth, 1990–2003

The world's population in 2100

May 13th 2011, 13:48 by The Economist online
The world’s population will reach 7 billion by the end of October, according to the latest projections from the United Nations. For the first time the UN has attempted to look as far ahead as 2100, using various assumptions about how fertility and mortality rates might change over the years. The average of these estimates suggests that the global population will cross 10 billion by 2085. By 2100, 22.3% of people will be aged 65 or over, up from just 7.6% in 2010. The bulk of population growth is expected to come from the developing world. Africa’s population will rise from 1 billion in 2010 to 3.6 billion in 2100. In 1950, 32% of the world’s people lived in today’s rich countries. By 2100, only 13% will.

The world's population in 2100

Struggles for Water Resource

The Coming Water Wars, International Networks Archive (INA), Princeton University (http://www.princeton.edu/~ina/index.html)

This map shows that water can become a major source of struggle for resources.

Struggles for Water Resource

Global poverty-biodiversity map

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/global-poverty-biodiversity-map

 

Global poverty-biodiversity map. This map may be used to show areas in which biodiversity is threatened. Areas where high poverty and high population density coincides with high biodiversity may indicate areas in which poor people likely have no other choice than to unsustainably extract resources, in turn threatening biodiversity. The map has been produced from three primary data sources – stunted growth data collected on first level administrative units from FAO (FAO 2004), population density from LandScan (LandScan, 2002), and areas of high biological significance (major tropical wilderness and biodiversity hotspots) from Conservation International (Christ et al., 2003).

Global poverty-biodiversity map

The boom in shipping trade

The boom in shipping trade. Map showing The boom in shipping trade and a graphic showing world imports.
Sources John Vidal, “Shipping boom fuels rising tide of global CO2 emissions”, The Guardian, February 13 2008; Atlas du Monde Diplomatique 2006, Armand Colin; Panorama des ports de commerce mondiaux 2003, ISEMAR, January 2005; Images économiques du monde 2002, Sedes.

 

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The boom in shipping trade

Green Jobs in the Future

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/green-jobs-in-the-future

 

Sources: UNEP-ILO-IOD-ITUC, Green Jobs: Towards decent work in a sustainable, low carbon world, 2008

Green Jobs in the Future

Water supply and sanitation coverage in Africa

Water supply and sanitation coverage in Africa. The water supply situation in Africa is already precarious, and climate change is expected to exacerbate the problem. This graphic shows the amount of water supply coverage at the national level for Africa, and the amount of sanitation coverage, as a percentage, at the national level for Africa. Statistics are shown for rural areas, for urban areas, and for all areas.

 

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Water supply and sanitation coverage in Africa