Images of globalization

Urban, dryland, and polar systems

Urban, dryland, and polar systems. Urban systems are built environments with a high human density. For mapping purposes, the MA uses known human settlements with a population of 5,000 or more, with boundaries delineated by observing persistent night-time lights or by inferring areal extent in the cases where such observations are absent.

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/urban-dryland-and-polar-systems

 

Urban, dryland, and polar systems

Human impact, year 2002 (Miller cylindrical projection)

Human impact, year 2002 (Miller cylindrical projection). The GLOBIO-2 model is based on settlements and modern infrastructure such as roads, powerlines and pipelines. This map presents the current situation, as a baseline for the GEO-3 scenarios. The main wilderness areas in the world are the Arctic, the Amazon, desert areas and the Tibetan plateau. This maps uses an older color scheme that does not differentiate between the three impact classes used in the GLOBIO-2 maps after 2001. http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/human_impact_year_2002_miller_cylindrica...

Human impact, year 2002 (Miller cylindrical projection)

Who gets the trash?

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/who-gets-the-trash

 

Who gets the trash?. As we continually update and invent new products the life of the old ones is getting shorter and shorter. Like shipbreaking, e-waste recycling involves the major producers and users, shipping the obsolete products to Asia, Eastern Europe, and Africa. But instead of being “green” we are exporting a sack full of problems to people who have to choose between poverty or poison. This graphic illustrates major receivers of e-waste in Asia.

 

Sources: Basel Action Network, Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition, Toxics Link India, SCOPE (Pakistan), Greenpeace China, 2002

Who gets the trash?

Country income groups (World Bank classification)

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/country-income-groups-world-bank-classif...

 

Country income groups (World Bank classification). There are huge regional differences in the above trends. Globally, poverty rates have fallen from 52% in 1981 to 42% in 1990 and to 26% in 2005. In Sub-Saharan Africa, however, the poverty rate remained constant at around 50%. This region also comprises the majority of countries making the least progress in reducing child malnutrition. The poverty rate in East Asia fell from nearly 80% in 1980 to under 20% by 2005. East Asia, notably China, was successful in more than halving the proportion of underweight children between 1990 and 2006. In contrast, and despite improvements since 1990, almost 50% of the children are underweight in Southern Asia. This region alone accounts for more than half the world’s malnourished children.

Country income groups (World Bank classification)

10 Years Of Internet Images

This image is from a September 10, 2008 article by Andrew Conry-Murray in InformationWeek (http://www.informationweek.com/news/internet/reporting/showArticle.jhtml...).

"In the Beginning: This is a map of the Internet in August 1998. The scan was conducted to a Class B level and shows over 88,000 routers."

See more images at http://www.informationweek.com/galleries/showImage.jhtml?galleryID=246&a....

10 Years Of Internet Images

Transportation Means

Getting Around: Transportation Today, International Networks Archive (INA), Princeton University (http://www.princeton.edu/~ina/index.html)

This graphic visualizes the various forms of transportation available to today's population.

Transportation Means