Images of globalization

The map of how bin Laden news spread through the Twittersphere

May 2, 2011, Dean Takahashi
http://venturebeat.com/2011/05/02/the-map-of-how-bin-laden-news-spread-t...

"The map above shows just how fast it all happened in the first 12 hours after the first tweets about the killing of the world’s most-wanted terrorist, starting around 730 pm Pacific time on Sunday. Sysomos said that its social media monitoring tool measured the spread.

Sheldon Levine of Sysomos said that about an hour and fifteen minutes after the word started spreading, and just as President Obama finished his address, there were more than 500,000 tweets, 796 blog posts and 507 published news articles. About 2.5 hours after the news broke, there were 860,177 tweets, 3,079 blog mentions, and 3,235 news stories."

The map of how bin Laden news spread through the Twittersphere

Gross Domestic Product (GDP) average annual growth, 1990–2003

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/gross-domestic-product-gdp-average-annua...

Gross Domestic Product (GDP) average annual growth, 1990–2003. Average annual percentage growth rate of GDP at market prices based on constant local currency. Dollar figures for GDP are converted from domestic currencies using 1995 official exchange rates. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products.

Gross Domestic Product (GDP) average annual growth, 1990–2003

Urban, dryland, and polar systems

Urban, dryland, and polar systems. Urban systems are built environments with a high human density. For mapping purposes, the MA uses known human settlements with a population of 5,000 or more, with boundaries delineated by observing persistent night-time lights or by inferring areal extent in the cases where such observations are absent.

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/urban-dryland-and-polar-systems

 

Urban, dryland, and polar systems

Global Trade in Forest Products

Sources: FAO 2008a. Link to web-site: http://grida.no/publications/vg/forest/ Cartographer/Designer: Philippe Rekacewicz assisted by Cecile Marin, Agnes Stienne, Guilio Frigieri, Riccardo Pravettoni, Laura Margueritte and Marion Lecoquierre. Appears in: Vital Forest Graphics Published: 2009 (Available UNEP)Global Trade in Forest Products

Transportation Means

Getting Around: Transportation Today, International Networks Archive (INA), Princeton University (http://www.princeton.edu/~ina/index.html)

This graphic visualizes the various forms of transportation available to today's population.

Transportation Means

The world's population in 2100

May 13th 2011, 13:48 by The Economist online
The world’s population will reach 7 billion by the end of October, according to the latest projections from the United Nations. For the first time the UN has attempted to look as far ahead as 2100, using various assumptions about how fertility and mortality rates might change over the years. The average of these estimates suggests that the global population will cross 10 billion by 2085. By 2100, 22.3% of people will be aged 65 or over, up from just 7.6% in 2010. The bulk of population growth is expected to come from the developing world. Africa’s population will rise from 1 billion in 2010 to 3.6 billion in 2100. In 1950, 32% of the world’s people lived in today’s rich countries. By 2100, only 13% will.

The world's population in 2100