Images of globalization

Commodity flows: Starbucks, McDonald's

Starbucks and McDonald's Map, International Networks Archive (INA), Princeton University (http://www.princeton.edu/~ina/index.html)

This map visualize the commodity flow mediated by Starbucks and McDonald's.

Commodity flows: Starbucks, McDonald's

The boom in shipping trade

The boom in shipping trade. Map showing The boom in shipping trade and a graphic showing world imports.
Sources John Vidal, “Shipping boom fuels rising tide of global CO2 emissions”, The Guardian, February 13 2008; Atlas du Monde Diplomatique 2006, Armand Colin; Panorama des ports de commerce mondiaux 2003, ISEMAR, January 2005; Images économiques du monde 2002, Sedes.

 

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/the-boom-in-shipping-trade1

The boom in shipping trade

Water supply and sanitation coverage in Africa

Water supply and sanitation coverage in Africa. The water supply situation in Africa is already precarious, and climate change is expected to exacerbate the problem. This graphic shows the amount of water supply coverage at the national level for Africa, and the amount of sanitation coverage, as a percentage, at the national level for Africa. Statistics are shown for rural areas, for urban areas, and for all areas.

 

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/water-supply-and-sanitation-coverage-in-...

Water supply and sanitation coverage in Africa

Undersea Cables

Undersea cables (http://news.cnet.com/2300-1033_3-6035611-1.html)

Photo by TeleGeography Research

The vast bulk of international telephone and Internet traffic travels through underwater cables. This map shows the cables that were in use as of the end of 2004 and gives an indication of where traffic is heaviest.

Undersea Cables

Country income groups (World Bank classification)

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/country-income-groups-world-bank-classif...

 

Country income groups (World Bank classification). There are huge regional differences in the above trends. Globally, poverty rates have fallen from 52% in 1981 to 42% in 1990 and to 26% in 2005. In Sub-Saharan Africa, however, the poverty rate remained constant at around 50%. This region also comprises the majority of countries making the least progress in reducing child malnutrition. The poverty rate in East Asia fell from nearly 80% in 1980 to under 20% by 2005. East Asia, notably China, was successful in more than halving the proportion of underweight children between 1990 and 2006. In contrast, and despite improvements since 1990, almost 50% of the children are underweight in Southern Asia. This region alone accounts for more than half the world’s malnourished children.

Country income groups (World Bank classification)