Images of globalization

Urban population: status and trends

Urban population: status and trends. Since the dawn of civilization, people have been aggregating in towns and cities. This trend has reached an even higher rate with the dawn of industrialisation, and especially in developing countries, as seen in the graphic. From 1975 to 2015 the number of people in urban areas is projected to more than double.

 

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/urban_population_status_and_trends

Urban population: status and trends

Trends in real commodity prices

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/trends-in-real-commodity-prices

 

Trends in real commodity prices. Agriculture is a fundamental instrument for sustainable development; about 70% of the world’s poor are rural and most are involved in farming. National policy needs to arrive at a balance between a higher prices which can benefit producers and lead to a more vibrant rural economy, and lower prices, which, although volatile on the international market, can improve food access for poor consumers.

 

Source: The State of Agricultural Commodity Markets 2006, FAO

Trends in real commodity prices

The world's population in 2100

May 13th 2011, 13:48 by The Economist online
The world’s population will reach 7 billion by the end of October, according to the latest projections from the United Nations. For the first time the UN has attempted to look as far ahead as 2100, using various assumptions about how fertility and mortality rates might change over the years. The average of these estimates suggests that the global population will cross 10 billion by 2085. By 2100, 22.3% of people will be aged 65 or over, up from just 7.6% in 2010. The bulk of population growth is expected to come from the developing world. Africa’s population will rise from 1 billion in 2010 to 3.6 billion in 2100. In 1950, 32% of the world’s people lived in today’s rich countries. By 2100, only 13% will.

The world's population in 2100

World poverty distribution

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/world-poverty-distribution

 

World poverty distribution. Three-quarters of all poor people still live in rural areas. They are heavily reliant on natural resources for their livelihoods: soil, water, forests and fisheries underpin commercial and subsistence activities and often provide a safety net to the poor in times of crises. These natural resources which are abundant in many developing countries - represent an important asset and potential wealth for poor people and their communities. As many of these natural resources are renewable and if properly managed this wealth is long term. Improved natural resource management can support long-term economic growth, from which poor people, in rural areas and elsewhere, can benefit to achieve and sustain social progress and development. The map is a part of a set, presenting different natural resources, with a focus on developing countries, and the use of natural resources for economic growth and poverty alleviation.

World poverty distribution

Gross Domestic Product (GDP) average annual growth, 1990–2003

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/gross-domestic-product-gdp-average-annua...

Gross Domestic Product (GDP) average annual growth, 1990–2003. Average annual percentage growth rate of GDP at market prices based on constant local currency. Dollar figures for GDP are converted from domestic currencies using 1995 official exchange rates. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products.

Gross Domestic Product (GDP) average annual growth, 1990–2003