Images of globalization

Global Trade in Forest Products

Sources: FAO 2008a. Link to web-site: http://grida.no/publications/vg/forest/ Cartographer/Designer: Philippe Rekacewicz assisted by Cecile Marin, Agnes Stienne, Guilio Frigieri, Riccardo Pravettoni, Laura Margueritte and Marion Lecoquierre. Appears in: Vital Forest Graphics Published: 2009 (Available UNEP)Global Trade in Forest Products

Transportation Means

Getting Around: Transportation Today, International Networks Archive (INA), Princeton University (http://www.princeton.edu/~ina/index.html)

This graphic visualizes the various forms of transportation available to today's population.

Transportation Means

Transnational North American Rail

The rail network of North America continues to consolidate, but it is beginning to become transnational as well.Since NAFTA, Canadian National has acquired several US regional railways, and Kansas City Southern has purchased Transportacion Ferroviaria Mexicana — both part of a drive towards a "NAFTA Rail" alliance. Together the eight Class I railroads (defined as having more than $277.7m in revenues) shown on the map control approximately two thirds of all rail on the continent. There are more than four hundred Class II and III railways. From http://www.radicalcartography.net/index.html?rail

Transnational North American Rail
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Gross Domestic Product (GDP) average annual growth, 1990–2003

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/gross-domestic-product-gdp-average-annua...

Gross Domestic Product (GDP) average annual growth, 1990–2003. Average annual percentage growth rate of GDP at market prices based on constant local currency. Dollar figures for GDP are converted from domestic currencies using 1995 official exchange rates. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products.

Gross Domestic Product (GDP) average annual growth, 1990–2003

Country income groups (World Bank classification)

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/country-income-groups-world-bank-classif...

 

Country income groups (World Bank classification). There are huge regional differences in the above trends. Globally, poverty rates have fallen from 52% in 1981 to 42% in 1990 and to 26% in 2005. In Sub-Saharan Africa, however, the poverty rate remained constant at around 50%. This region also comprises the majority of countries making the least progress in reducing child malnutrition. The poverty rate in East Asia fell from nearly 80% in 1980 to under 20% by 2005. East Asia, notably China, was successful in more than halving the proportion of underweight children between 1990 and 2006. In contrast, and despite improvements since 1990, almost 50% of the children are underweight in Southern Asia. This region alone accounts for more than half the world’s malnourished children.

Country income groups (World Bank classification)

Undersea Cables

Undersea cables (http://news.cnet.com/2300-1033_3-6035611-1.html)

Photo by TeleGeography Research

The vast bulk of international telephone and Internet traffic travels through underwater cables. This map shows the cables that were in use as of the end of 2004 and gives an indication of where traffic is heaviest.

Undersea Cables

Global poverty-biodiversity map

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/global-poverty-biodiversity-map

 

Global poverty-biodiversity map. This map may be used to show areas in which biodiversity is threatened. Areas where high poverty and high population density coincides with high biodiversity may indicate areas in which poor people likely have no other choice than to unsustainably extract resources, in turn threatening biodiversity. The map has been produced from three primary data sources – stunted growth data collected on first level administrative units from FAO (FAO 2004), population density from LandScan (LandScan, 2002), and areas of high biological significance (major tropical wilderness and biodiversity hotspots) from Conservation International (Christ et al., 2003).

Global poverty-biodiversity map