South America

International Drug Traffficking

Although they are not mutually exclusive, international crime and terrorism comprise the darker sides of globalization. They use technologies, networks, and connections similarly to the way legal enterprises do, but also endeavor to subvert the work and connections that have made by the forces of the lighter side of globalization.

Plantation Agriculture's Discontents

Recently, Chiquita Banana was fined $27 million by the US Justice Department after paying protection money to Colombian guerrillas (according to the United States government they are terrorists).  Obviously, it is reprehensible that a US company should support an organization that kidnaps, murders, and traffics in narcotics.  The issue is now closed, because Chiquita closed their operations there in 2004, but this story is one dark blot on a larger tapestry of context.  F

Social Networking in Latin America

Social networking is an Internet phenomenon that allows users to connect and interact with friends, colleagues, or anyone with a shared interest. These sites can simplify communication over vast geographical boundaries, or as is the case on college campuses, very small ones. Another feature of the social networking sites is that they allow users to craft their own profiles, or public persona, for anonymous browsers to view. Formerly, one would need knowledge of web design to create a personal information page, but social networking makes the process easy. Users can make their own profiles private, but usually at least a picture is available to strangers.

A Transnational South America?

On May 24, the nations of South America signed a treaty to create Unasur, a regional parliament that builds upon the trading agreements Mercosur and the Andean Community, but also may coordinate common military defense actions. <Read the article here >

 

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