Bibliography

Found 6 results

Filters: keyword is Popular Culture  [Clear All Filters]
2007
Chinese Modernity and Global Biopolitics: Studies in Literature and Visual Culture, Lu, Sheldon H , 2007///, Issue Honolulu, Honolulu, p.264, (2007)

Description

Sheldon Lu draws on Chinese literature, film, art, photography, and video to broadly map the emergence of modern China in relation to the capitalist world-system in the economic, social, and political realms. Central to his study is the investigation of biopower and body politics, namely, the experience of globalization on a personal level.
Lu first outlines the trajectory of the body in modern Chinese literature by focusing on the adventures, pleasures, and sufferings of the male (and female) body in the writings of selected authors. He then turns to avant-garde and performance art, tackling the physical self more directly through a consideration of work that takes the body as its very theme, material, and medium. In an exploration of mass visual culture, Lu analyzes artistic reactions to the multiple, uneven effects of globalization and modernization on both the physical landscape of China and the interior psyche of its citizens. This is followed by an investigation of contemporary Chinese urban space in popular cinema and experimental photography and art. Examples are offered that capture the daily lives of contemporary Chinese as they struggle to make the transition from the vanishing space of the socialist lifestyle to the new capitalist economy of commodities. Lu reexamines the history and implications of China's belated integration into the capitalist world system before closing with a postscript that traces the genealogy of the term "postsocialism" and points to the real relevance of the idea for the examination of everyday life in China in the twenty-first century.

New Television, Globalisation, and the East Asian Cultural Imagination, Keane, Michael , 2007///, Issue Hong Kong, p.220, (2007)

Challenging assumptions that have underpinned critiques of globalization and combining cultural theory with media industry analysis, Keane, Fung and Moran give a groundbreaking account of the evolution of television in the post-broadcasting era, and how programming ideas are creatively redeveloped and franchised in East Asia. In this first comprehensive study of television program adaptation across cultures, the authors argue that adaptation, transfer, and recycling of content are multiplying to the point of marginalising other economic and cultural practices. This is happening in television, but also in many other media and related areas of cultural production. Looking at China, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea and Taiwan, this study details practices that are variously referred to as formatting, franchising, imitation, adaptation, hybridity, bricolage, and even emulation. The authors show that significant re-modelling of local TV production practices occur when adaptation is genuinely responsive to local values. Examples of East Asian format adaptations include Survivor, Who Wants to be a Millionaire?, The Weakest Link, Coronation Street, and Idol. The book offers alternatives models of media flow that demonstrate how Hollywood is losing its global grip. It deals with the history of the TV format trade, a movement that has coincided with the rise of alternative centres of television production and distribution outside the US.

Theatre, performance and new media in Africa, Susan Arndt; Eckhard Breitinger; Marek Spitczok von Brisinski , (2007) Abstract
2003
Multiple Modernities: Cinemas and Popular Media in Transcultural East Asia, Lau, Jenny Kwok Wah , 2003///, Issue Philadelph, Philadelphia, p.250, (2003)

Multiple Modernities explores the cultural terrain of East Asia. Arguing that becoming modern happens differently in different places, the contributors examines popular culture-most notable cinema and television-to see how modernization, as both a response to the West and as a process that is unique in its own right in the region, operates on a mass level.Included in this collection are significant explorations of popular culture in East Asia, including Chinese new cinema and rock music, Korean cinema, Taiwanese television, as well as discussions of alternative arts in general.While each essay focuses on specific nations or cinemas, the collected effect of reading them is to offer a comprehensive, in-depth picture of how popular culture in East Asia operates to both generate and reflect the immense change this significant region of the world is undergoing.

2002
Global Goes Local: Popular Culture in Asia, King, Richard; Craig, Timothy J. , 2002///, Issue Vancouver, Vancouver, p.309, (2002)

Global Goes Local examines popular culture from pop music in contemporary Korea and pre-war Shanghai to television dramas in China and TV commercials in Malaysia. International scholars with varying disciplinary perspectives show how imported cultural forms can be invested with fresh meaning and transformed by local artists to assert identity and express resistance. This collection tackles significant questions about popular culture and offers case studies of how culture suffers, survives, or prospers in Asian communities in an age of global communication.

1999
Japanese Rap Music: An Ethnography of Globalization in Popular Culture, Condry, Ian , 1999///, (1999)

In this lively ethnography Ian Condry interprets Japan’s vibrant hip-hop scene, explaining how a music and culture that originated halfway around the world is appropriated and remade in Tokyo clubs and recording studios. Illuminating different aspects of Japanese hip-hop, Condry chronicles how self-described “yellow B-Boys” express their devotion to “black culture,” how they combine the figure of the samurai with American rapping techniques and gangsta imagery, and how underground artists compete with pop icons to define “real” Japanese hip-hop. He discusses how rappers manipulate the Japanese language to achieve rhyme and rhythmic flow and how Japan’s female rappers struggle to find a place in a male-dominated genre. Condry pays particular attention to the messages of emcees, considering how their raps take on subjects including Japan’s education system, its sex industry, teenage bullying victims turned schoolyard murderers, and even America’s handling of the war on terror.

Condry attended more than 120 hip-hop performances in clubs in and around Tokyo, sat in on dozens of studio recording sessions, and interviewed rappers, music company executives, music store owners, and journalists. Situating the voices of Japanese artists in the specific nightclubs where hip-hop is performed—what musicians and fans call the genba (actual site) of the scene—he draws attention to the collaborative, improvisatory character of cultural globalization. He contends that it was the pull of grassroots connections and individual performers rather than the push of big media corporations that initially energized and popularized hip-hop in Japan. Zeebra, DJ Krush, Crazy-A, Rhymester, and a host of other artists created Japanese rap, one performance at a time.