Bibliography

Found 6 results

Filters: keyword is Music  [Clear All Filters]
2007
Theatre, performance and new media in Africa, Susan Arndt; Eckhard Breitinger; Marek Spitczok von Brisinski , (2007) Abstract
2006
Hip-Hop Japan: Rap and the Paths of Cultural Globalization, Condry, Ian , 2006///, Issue Durham, Durham, (2006)

Ian Condry interprets Japan’s vibrant hip-hop scene, explaining how a music and culture that originated halfway around the world is appropriated and remade in Tokyo clubs and recording studios. Illuminating different aspects of Japanese hip-hop, Condry chronicles how self-described “yellow B-Boys” express their devotion to “black culture,” how they combine the figure of the samurai with American rapping techniques and gangsta imagery, and how underground artists compete with pop icons to define “real” Japanese hip-hop. He discusses how rappers manipulate the Japanese language to achieve rhyme and rhythmic flow and how Japan’s female rappers struggle to find a place in a male-dominated genre. Condry pays particular attention to the messages of emcees, considering how their raps take on subjects including Japan’s education system, its sex industry, teenage bullying victims turned schoolyard murderers, and even America’s handling of the war on terror.

Korean Pop Music: Riding the Wave, Howard, Keith , 2006///, Issue Folkestone, p.250, (2006)

Korean popular music has in the last decade become a significant model for youth culture throughout Asia. Yet, although the Korean music industry is both vibrant and massive, this is the first book-length work devoted to Korean pop music in English. The book offers a comprehensive account written by thirteen scholars of Korean Studies, ethnomusicology and popular culture from Canada, Great Britain, Korea, the Netherlands, New Zealand and the US. It charts Korean pop from the 1930s to the present day, from genres imitative of early twentieth-century European and Japanese styles ('trot' and 'yuhaengga') to contemporary punk clubs, rap bands and music television shows. Consideration is given to South Korean singers who catered for American troops in the aftermath of the Korean War, to acoustic guitar songs and their use in 1970s' student protest movements against military dictatorship, to state propaganda pop, and to the explosion of global styles that marked the 1990s. Lyrics and dance, media packaging and stage costumes, song rooms and singing doctors, highway songs and new folksongs, and the impact of the Internet are all explored. The book also includes extensive discussion of North Korean popular music and chapters on the 'Korea wave' that swept Taiwan and the Chinese mainland at the start of the new millennium.

2005
Othering ourselves: Identity and globalization in Korean popular music, 1992--2002, Lee, Hee-Eun , p.197, (2005) Abstract
2002
Performing Africa, Ebron,Paulla A , 2002///, Issue Princeton,, Princeton, p.244, (2002)

The jali--a member of a hereditary group of Mandinka professional performers--is a charismatic but contradictory figure. He is at once the repository of his people's history, the voice of contemporary political authority, the inspiration for African American dreams of an African homeland, and the chief entertainment for the burgeoning transnational tourist industry. Numerous journalists, scholars, politicians, and culture aficionados have tried to pin him down. This book shows how the jali's talents at performance make him a genius at representation--the ideal figure to tell us about the "Africa" that the world imagines, which is always a thing of illusion, magic, and contradiction.

Africa often enters the global imagination through news accounts of ethnic war, famine, and despotic political regimes. Those interested in countering such dystopic images--be they cultural nationalists in the African diaspora or connoisseurs of "global culture"--often found their representations of an emancipatory Africa on an enthusiasm for West African popular culture and performance arts. Based on extensive field research in The Gambia and focusing on the figure of the jali, Performing Africa interrogates these representations together with their cultural and political implications. It explores how Africa is produced, circulated, and consumed through performance and how encounters through performance create the place of Africa in the world. Innovative and discerning, Performing Africa is a provocative contribution to debates over cultural nationalism and the construction of identity and history in Africa and elsewhere.

1999
Japanese Rap Music: An Ethnography of Globalization in Popular Culture, Condry, Ian , 1999///, (1999)

In this lively ethnography Ian Condry interprets Japan’s vibrant hip-hop scene, explaining how a music and culture that originated halfway around the world is appropriated and remade in Tokyo clubs and recording studios. Illuminating different aspects of Japanese hip-hop, Condry chronicles how self-described “yellow B-Boys” express their devotion to “black culture,” how they combine the figure of the samurai with American rapping techniques and gangsta imagery, and how underground artists compete with pop icons to define “real” Japanese hip-hop. He discusses how rappers manipulate the Japanese language to achieve rhyme and rhythmic flow and how Japan’s female rappers struggle to find a place in a male-dominated genre. Condry pays particular attention to the messages of emcees, considering how their raps take on subjects including Japan’s education system, its sex industry, teenage bullying victims turned schoolyard murderers, and even America’s handling of the war on terror.

Condry attended more than 120 hip-hop performances in clubs in and around Tokyo, sat in on dozens of studio recording sessions, and interviewed rappers, music company executives, music store owners, and journalists. Situating the voices of Japanese artists in the specific nightclubs where hip-hop is performed—what musicians and fans call the genba (actual site) of the scene—he draws attention to the collaborative, improvisatory character of cultural globalization. He contends that it was the pull of grassroots connections and individual performers rather than the push of big media corporations that initially energized and popularized hip-hop in Japan. Zeebra, DJ Krush, Crazy-A, Rhymester, and a host of other artists created Japanese rap, one performance at a time.